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Product Description

CLK WiFi device is the newly developed wireless scan tool for the iPhone and iPad.

It supports all OBD-II protocols

Works with all OBD-II compliant vehicles

Wireless ( uses WiFi standard 802.11a/b/g )

Please note -
This WiFi adaptor does not include software, this must be downloaded / purchased separately.

Software available for apple products via the Apple App store
(Search the App store for FuzzyCar, REV or Dash Command)


Software available elsewhere on the internet for the
Windows PC

Supports ISO 9141, KWP2000

Supports SAE J1850

Supports CAN bus

Features & Benefits

Read diagnostic trouble codes, both generic and manufacturer-specific, and display their meaning (over 3000 generic  code definitions in the database) direct on your iPhone or iPad.

Clear trouble codes and turn off the MIL ("Check Engine" light)

Display current sensor data, including:

Engine RPM

Calculated Load Value

Coolant Temperature

Fuel System Status

Vehicle Speed

Short Term Fuel Trim

Long Term Fuel Trim

Intake Manifold Pressure

Timing Advance

Intake Air Temperature

Air Flow Rate

Absolute Throttle Position

Oxygen sensor voltages/associated short term fuel trims

Fuel System status

Fuel Pressure

And many others...

Will it work on my Car ?

In 1996 in the United States, a Federal Law came into force requiring all US-sold cars to be OBD2 compliant. Most OBD2 tools are therefore advertised as working with all cars from 1996.

 The OBD2 Federal Law applied only to cars sold in the US.

 In the UK and the rest of Europe, our equivalent law (European On-Board Diagnostics, or EOBD) did not come into force, and more importantly, was not fully implemented by our car manufacturers, until 2001 for petrol cars (2003/4 for diesels).

 Due to this it is difficult to know exactly what European vehicles are OBD2 compliant before the above dates and we recommend checking with your dealer before purchasing equipment for cars manufactured before 2001 Petrol and 2004 Diesel.

 All Cars sold from 2008 use the CAN-Bus protocol.

What good does it do to measure OBD-II output?

OBD-II signals are most often sought in response to a "Check Engine Light" appearing on the dashboard or driveability problems experienced with the vehicle. The data provided by OBD-II can often pinpoint the specific component that has malfunctioned, saving substantial time and cost compared to guess-and-replace repairs. Scanning OBD-II signals can also provide valuable information on the condition of a used car purchase.


Tell me about that "Check Engine Light".

The service industry calls the Check Engine light on your dash an "MIL" or Malfunction Indicator Light. It shows three different types of signals. Occasional flashes show momentary malfunctions. It stays on if the problem is of a more serious nature, affecting the emissions output or safety of the vehicle. A constantly flashing MIL is a sign of a major problem which can cause serious damage if the engine is not stopped immediately. In all cases a "freeze frame" of all sensor readings at the time is recorded in the central computer of the vehicle.

Hard failure signals caused by serious problems will cause the MIL to stay on any time the car is running until the problem is repaired and the MIL reset. Intermittent failures cause the MIL to light momentarily and they often go out before the problem is located. The freeze frame of the car's condition captured in the computer at the time of the malfunction can be very valuable in diagnosing these intermittent problems. However, in some cases if the car completes three driving cycles without a re-occurrence of the problem, the freeze frame will be erased.


OBD-II and your car's health

Because of their investment in the equipment required, most repair shops charge a fee, some-times substantial, to attach the scanning equipment and diagnose problems using the OBD-II system signals. Home mechanics and small shop technicians have been restricted from working with these signals by the cost and technical complexity of the equipment. With the introduction of more economical and user friendly scanning devices, it is now practical for almost anyone to access OBD-II signals and use them for their own testing and repairs.

Scanners vary greatly in their complexity. The best connect easily and use software to quickly and automatically call up the OBD-II information. They should have recording ability so that data can be collected during a test drive without distracting the technician driving the car. A system connecting to a laptop or desk top computer provides expanded memory for data and the ability to export data to a spreadsheet or graphing utility.